Carrier oil of the month – Carrot

Carrot

The carrot was first introduced to Britain during the reign if Queen Elizabeth 1 by Flemish refugees. The root crop that we are familiar with today was developed from the Daucus carota, and has an edible fleshy orange root.

Oil is extracted from the carrot by maceration: the root is chopped into small pieces and left to steep in sunflower oil for about 3 weeks. The material is then filtered to produce an oil that is rich orange in colour, and capable of staining the skin and clothing. For this very reason, carrot extract was one of the major active ingredients used in ‘tanning pills’ – a product now band in the UK due to its potentially toxic side-effects.

Carrot oil is particularly popular in ‘anti-ageing’ beauty products as it is rich in vitamin A and beta-carotene, both of which are reputed to keep skin supple and prevent damage from free radicals. However, carrot oil (unless extracted from the white-rooted, wild version of the plant, known as Queen Anne’s Lace) is not generally recommended as a massage oil.

Main therapeutic uses:
Carrot oil is used in many cosmetic products (particularly those which claim to be ‘anti-ageing’) as it is a rich source of beta-carotene and vitamin A. The oil is also reputed to help the skin’s natural healing process by assisting in the formation of scar tissue. Carrot extracts can be found in a number of sun creams and after-sun lotions. May soothe skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis.

Main constituents
Beta-carotene, and vitamin A, B, C, D, E and F.

Other comments

  • Use is not recommended during pregnancy.
  • The oil was traditionally used as a remedy for flatulence and stomach acidity.
  • Carrot oil is an approved food colouring.
  • It is the carotenes that produce the roots’ rich orange colour.
  • The carotenes can be extracted with the use of a solvent.

Disclaimer: The information provided on our blog is for personal information and educational interest only. It is not intended to offer professional medical advice, diagnosis or cure for any medical condition or disorder. If you have any health concerns we would strongly advise you your consult your GP or health care professional. If you want to receive aromatherapy treatment we would advise making an appointment with a fully qualified aromatherapist who will conduct a full consultation of your health history and provide you with a tailored treatment programme. If pregnant or taking medication it is recommended to seek professional medical advice before using aromatherapy. The information we provide is on the basis that there are no known contra-indications to treatment. Purple Flame aromatherapy accepts no liability for the misuse of essential oils and other products or for reliance on the information we provide.Disclaimer: The information provided on our blog is for personal information and educational interest only. It is not intended to offer professional medical advice, diagnosis or cure for any medical condition or disorder. If you have any health concerns we would strongly advise you your consult your GP or health care professional. If you want to receive aromatherapy treatment we would advise making an appointment with a fully qualified aromatherapist who will conduct a full consultation of your health history and provide you with a tailored treatment programme. If pregnant or taking medication it is recommended to seek professional medical advice before using aromatherapy. The information we provide is on the basis that there are no known contra-indications to treatment. Purple Flame aromatherapy accepts no liability for the misuse of essential oils and other products or for reliance on the information we provide.