Carrier oil of the month – Calendula

Calendula

Calendula originates from the Mediterranean region, and it has been grown for its single or double, yellow to bright orange flowers since the Middle Ages. It is now found in gardens worldwide and grows to about 50cm high, blooming continuously throughout the summer.

The plant likes sun and will re-seed from year to year, even in poor soil. Seeds are crescent to horseshoe in shape with a rough exterior.

Calendula oils is usually obtained by maceration – the blossoms are steeped in vegetable oil. The vegetable oils may vary. An absolute can also be produced by solvent extraction of the flowers.

Main properties
Anti-bacterial; anti-fungal; anti-inflammatory

Main therapeutic uses
Said to be good for broken veins, bruises and eczema. Calendula oil is often used to lessen scarring from wounds, stitches and child birth (stretch marks). It is also used in facial compresses, and has proved successful in preparations for chapped and cracked skin.

Main constituents
Calendulin; glycerides of linoleic acid; glycerides of oleic acid.

Other Comments

  • During the Civil war Calendula was used on the battle fields to treat bleeding wounds.
  • Calendula has been used for many years in the kitchen: the bright flowers were used to dye butter and cheese and the petals are still sprinkled on salads and other foods today by the discerning chef.
  • Calendula is Latin for Calendae (the first day of the month) as the plant flowers all year round in the wild. ‘Officinalis’ applies to all plans that have been used as medicinal herbs.
  • Like all macerated oils, Calendula is more expensive than a basic carrier oil and so it is common to mix 25% Calendula oil with 7% of an appropriate fixed oil.

Disclaimer: The information provided on our blog is for personal information and educational interest only. It is not intended to offer professional medical advice, diagnosis or cure for any medical condition or disorder. If you have any health concerns we would strongly advise you your consult your GP or health care professional. If you want to receive aromatherapy treatment we would advise making an appointment with a fully qualified aromatherapist who will conduct a full consultation of your health history and provide you with a tailored treatment programme. If pregnant or taking medication it is recommended to seek professional medical advice before using aromatherapy. The information we provide is on the basis that there are no known contra-indications to treatment. Purple Flame aromatherapy accepts no liability for the misuse of essential oils and other products or for reliance on the information we provide.Disclaimer: The information provided on our blog is for personal information and educational interest only. It is not intended to offer professional medical advice, diagnosis or cure for any medical condition or disorder. If you have any health concerns we would strongly advise you your consult your GP or health care professional. If you want to receive aromatherapy treatment we would advise making an appointment with a fully qualified aromatherapist who will conduct a full consultation of your health history and provide you with a tailored treatment programme. If pregnant or taking medication it is recommended to seek professional medical advice before using aromatherapy. The information we provide is on the basis that there are no known contra-indications to treatment. Purple Flame aromatherapy accepts no liability for the misuse of essential oils and other products or for reliance on the information we provide.