Carrier oil of the month – Borage

Borage

Also known as Starflower, Borage originated in the Middle East, but is now cultivated worldwide. The plant grows to approximately 60cm in height, with hairy stems and pretty sky blue, shaped flowers (hence its alternative name).

In the middle ages, an ability to cheer the melancholic was recorded, whilst poultices were used topically to treat inflammation and swellings. Indeed, one of the main reasons Borage oil has grown in popularity in recent years is because it contains twice as much gamma-linolenic acid (GLA) as Evening Primrose Oil. The body converts GLA to prostaglandins, which have anti-inflammatory properties, and are particularly useful in the treatment of hormone related conditions such as tender breasts, menstrual cramps, and water retention.

Main Therapeutic uses
Borage oil has been shown to improve skin function in the elderly in particular. Not surprisingly, it is thus found in many anti-aging products. Clinical trials strongly indicate that the plant is also successful in the treatment of topical eczema and dermatitis. Traditionally, the leaves and seeds were used to promote milk supply in nursing mothers, and herbalists still consider the seeds of this plant to be beneficial to lactating women.

Main constituents
Linoleic acid; gamm-linolenic acid (GLA); glycerides of oleic acid, palmitic acid; stearic acid.

Other comments

  • The oil used for massage is extracted from the seeds which are cold pressed.
  • Borage is also referred to as Bee Bread or Bee Plant, as its flowers are rich in nectar and thus attracts honey bees.
  • Borage may be from the Latin burra, meaning hairy garment
  • The young leaves of this plant are eaten in salads, producing a taste similar to cucumber.
  • The flowers can be candied (impregnated or encrusted in sugar).
  • The health supplements information service (hsis.org) recommend that epileptics should check with their Doctor before taking supplements with borage.

Disclaimer: The information provided on our blog is for personal information and educational interest only. It is not intended to offer professional medical advice, diagnosis or cure for any medical condition or disorder. If you have any health concerns we would strongly advise you your consult your GP or health care professional. If you want to receive aromatherapy treatment we would advise making an appointment with a fully qualified aromatherapist who will conduct a full consultation of your health history and provide you with a tailored treatment programme. If pregnant or taking medication it is recommended to seek professional medical advice before using aromatherapy. The information we provide is on the basis that there are no known contra-indications to treatment. Purple Flame aromatherapy accepts no liability for the misuse of essential oils and other products or for reliance on the information we provide.Disclaimer: The information provided on our blog is for personal information and educational interest only. It is not intended to offer professional medical advice, diagnosis or cure for any medical condition or disorder. If you have any health concerns we would strongly advise you your consult your GP or health care professional. If you want to receive aromatherapy treatment we would advise making an appointment with a fully qualified aromatherapist who will conduct a full consultation of your health history and provide you with a tailored treatment programme. If pregnant or taking medication it is recommended to seek professional medical advice before using aromatherapy. The information we provide is on the basis that there are no known contra-indications to treatment. Purple Flame aromatherapy accepts no liability for the misuse of essential oils and other products or for reliance on the information we provide.